Applying Quality Management (QM) Principles To Wellness Committees

Their is no disputing that the heart of a successful wellness program lies in a dynamic committee.  And, many important QM principles can be applied to the structure and function of your wellness committee.

Almost 75 percent of wellness professionals surveyed said they have a wellness committee for their organizational programs, and 80 percent said the committees are important for the success of their workplace wellness efforts, the survey revealed.  The survey was conducted by the Wellness Management Information Center.

Feedback

“The feedback the committee members provide is invaluable,” said a wellness program manager.  “They represent  Continue reading

Workplace Wellness Certificate Tells the World You Know Your Stuff

Editor’s Note: This article is one of the most read posts on Wellness Manager.

A certification program raises the professional stature of the profession. A ‘certified’ manager in any profession is generally worth more money in the marketplace.

It is a credential that could mean the difference in competing for or getting a job.

It tells the hiring manager that you worked harder than the other person to earn the certificate. Generally, only a percentage of the profession will rise to hold the certificate.

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Secrets to Wellness and Health Promotion ROI: How Successful Managers Attract and Motivate Increased Participation in Their Programs PDF Format
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The National Wellness Institute and WebMD launched a five level Certification Program for Worksite Wellness practitioners.

Larry Chapman, a well known and highly regarded expert consultant on wellness and health promotion, has been serving as the trainer for the certification classes held in conjunction with the annual National Wellness Institute program.

Each level requires two full days of training and successful completion of a Challenge Exam. Each level is focused on twelve different key skills critical to the design and implementation of a successful employee wellness program, according to the program description.

Level I Certified Wellness Program Coordinator (CWPC) is designed for organizations with fewer than a thousand employees. Level II Certified Wellness Program Manager (CWPM) is for organizations with 1,000 to 10,000 employees.

Level III Certified Wellness Program Director (CWPD) is for organizations with more than 10,000 employees. Level IV Certified Worksite Wellness Program Consultant (CWWPC) can then work with any size organization.

The Level V Certified Worksite Wellness Professional (CWWP) is for any size organization plus ten (10) years of progressively more challenging program management and authorship of a recent related peer review article on worksite wellness.

For information on the Worksite Wellness professional certification program visit the National Wellness Institute: http://www.nationalwellness.org/?page=CWP

New Study: Workplace Wellness Programs Seen Cutting Chronic Costs

Workplace wellness programs can lower health care costs in workers with chronic diseases, but components of the programs that encourage workers to adopt healthier lifestyles may not reduce health costs or lead to lower net savings, according to a new research study.

Following a large employee wellness program sponsored PepsiCo, the study conducted by the Rand Corporation found that “efforts to help employees manage chronic illnesses saved $3.78 in health care costs for every $1 invested in the effort.”

However, the program’s lifestyle management components that encourage healthy living did not deliver returns that were higher than the costs, the researchers found.

“The PepsiCo program provides a substantial return for the investment made in helping employees manage chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease,” said Dr. Soeren Mattke, the study’s senior author and a senior natural scientist at RAND, a nonprofit research organization.

“But the lifestyle management component of the program — while delivering benefits — did not provide more savings than it cost to offer,” he continued.

With any prevention effort, it is often “easier to achieve cost savings in Continue reading

Quickest Way To A Workplace Wellness Question Answered – And It’s Free!

Say you had a question about some aspect of your wellness program’s walking initiative – or any other subject for that matter – fast answers from your peers in workplace wellness and health promotion is a couple of clicks away.

For instance, there are currently 283 posts – questions or answers on the subject of “walking” contributed by members of the Wellness Manager Professional Discussion Group.

Members simply ask a question related to managing a wellness program and in short order other members offer their knowledge and advice and what they have learned.

Wellness Manager Professional Discussion Group membership is free and there are no ‘spammy’ posts because the discussions are moderated and inappropriate posts are not approved.

Only members can ask or answer questions. Membership requires approval.

It’s about friends asking friends questions. And, the answers are genuinely helpful. Members aren’t pontificating or simply trying to promote themselves.

Inter-office weight loss challenges, fitness center membership incentives, wellness and disease management, health risk assessments, indicators of success, have been among the information-sharing topics by members of the discussion group.

It’s simple to join the group. Members include many names you will recognize among your colleagues.

There are currently 1522 members. We started the group in 2002.

If you are a wellness or health promotion professional you are encouraged to join. Just click on this link: http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/WellnessManager/info

Getting To The ROI Of A Wellness Program; You Need Measures And Analytics

The New Year is still young and there is still time to adopt another new resolution. Yeah, zeroing in on your wellness program’s return-on-investment (ROI.)

The ROI ‘issue’ is not going away. So let’s hunker down and figure out ways to successfully prove the winning results of your organization’s wellness or health promotion program.

The future for wellness professionals includes a healthy dose of doing those calculations surrounding the performance of your program.

But it is not without “measurement conundrums,” according to Larry Chapman, MPH, founder of the founder of Chapman Institute and a leading authority and thought leader on workplace wellness.

“One of the first issues is risk stratification as a core to our programming and how does it offer us better measurement opportunities,” he said during a workshop sponsored by Wellness Program Management Advisor and the Wellness Management Information Center.

“Think about the role of a health risk assessment and the ability for us to identify different risk strata groups and then deal with the role of incentives and communications in helping people that are actually in those risk categories make use of the programs and the interventions that we structure for them,” he urged.

Every place where a wellness manager sees a line here or a dotted line, “you can Continue reading

2014! Resolutions Don’t Come Easy

Happy New Year!

As we head into the New Year people are trying to hang on to their recently made resolutions. However, it is not enough to simply make a resolution; you must be motivated to sticking to it, according to one wellness professional.

Here are four keys to success in keeping resolutions that wellness program managers can share with program participants:

The first key to success is learning how to stay motivated.

“Motivation comes in spurts, so you have to work at keeping it in the forefront of your mind.”

Wellness program managers can help with employee motivation in a number of ways. Continue reading

“A Rose By Any Other Name……What’s In a Name….Or, In This Case Your Job Title?

The position titles of individuals managing or administering an organization’s wellness or health promotion program is high up on the searches by visitors to Wellness Manager.

The simple search query is “wellness titles.”

Although their duties are similar in scope, yes, workplace wellness professionals’ titles vary widely by organization, based on research by the Wellness Management Information Center.

Wellness professionals’ titles, it seems, are all over the “ballpark.”

By title, “coordinator” was the most frequent with 26.5 percent of participants, followed by “manager” with 22 percent, and “director” with 18.9 percent, found our research survey.

However, among all survey respondents, 42.4 percent had the word “wellness” as part of their title, while “health promotion” titles accounted for 12.1 percent of those who responded.

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Secrets to Wellness and Health Promotion ROI: How Successful Managers Attract and Motivate Increased Participation in PDF Format

Get success stories, expert advice, proven methods, practical goals, and “how-to” tips in this report created by our editorial team as an ‘insider’ briefing for workplace wellness and health promotion professionals.

Secrets To Wellness and Health Promotion ROI: How Successful Managers Attract and Motivate Increased Participation  

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Following is a representative sample of titles that we identified based on our survey:

wellness coordinator, wellness director, wellness/fitness manager, corporate wellness coordinator, director community health and wellness, director of health promotion, director,  and, worksite preventive health.

Also, employee health/wellness coordinator, health and wellness coordinator, health improvement manager, health promotion manager, health education and wellness manager and wellness program manager.

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Workplace Wellness Management Resources New Web Address

Our wellness management resources store page has a new web address following our migration to our new, improved web site at healthresourcesonline.com.

The store is protected for security with “Secure Socket Layer” or SSL to keep your transactions secure.

Because there are so many links to our management resources up on the Web we think it is a good idea to give you the new location link: https://www.healthresourcesonline.com/workplace-wellness-management.html

Program Success Motivates Employees To Participate In Health Promotion Programs

Getting employees to participate in worksite wellness programs is has been an ongoing chief concern of many wellness managers over the years, according to our Workplace Wellness Management Leadership survey.

Participation is the issue, said one corporate human resources director, because “most people are too busy or not motivated enough.”

Employee participation in an organization’s wellness program drives everything for wellness professionals, return on investment (ROI), healthier workforce, continued program funding and budget issues, and how a wellness manager is measured, so its a bottom line pocket-book issue.

Main concern: “Time crunch, employees can’t seem to find the time to get into the onsite fitness center,” said a company RN/fitness coordinator. “People in general just seem to be getting busier and busier!”

“It is just our lifestyles today as well as the mentality of employers — do more with less people,” the coordinator added.       Continue reading

Web-Based Health Promotion Program, Specially Designed For Truck Drivers

A fairly new program incorporating Web-based education is improving the health outcomes of truck drivers – a prime example of “lone workers,” according to results of a study.

Lone workers are at a special risk for poor diet due to limited healthy food choices, opportunities for exercise, and limited access to workplace wellness programs.

Truck drivers face the specific risks of obesity, diabetes, and traffic risks, according to Ryan Olson, PhD, and colleagues at the Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland who conducted the study.

After six months enrolled in the program, truckers reduced their weight by nearly eight pounds, on average, and improved their diets by reducing consumptions of fats and sugars, according to the study findings. An increase in physical activity was also noted. Continue reading