Monthly Archives: October 2015

Survey: Employers Want More Value in Health and Wellness Programs

Employers are putting a broader focus on the overall value of health management within a workplace, according to the ninth annual Willis Health and Productivity Survey.

Employers offering health and wellness programs are looking beyond the financial bottom line to evaluate success, according to a new study released this month.

Employers are putting a broader focus on the overall value of health management within a workplace, according to the ninth annual Willis Health and Productivity Survey.

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BEST PRACTICES FOR MANAGING FORMAL INCENTIVES THAT DRIVE EMPLOYEE PARTICIPATION AND ENGAGEMENT IN WORKPLACE WELLNESS AND HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAMS

Discover the latest generation of financial wellness incentives that are seen as an effective way to moderate healthcare cost increases and improve employee well being.

This report will help you and your organization establish best practices in administering your work site wellness program.

Click hear for details: Incentives That Drive Employee Participation in Wellness Programs

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A unit of Willis Group Holdings plc, a global risk advisor, insurance broker and reinsurance broker.

The survey called 2015 a “watershed year” for employer-sponsored health and wellness programs. Willis saw two different mindsets emerging in how organizations approach the measurement of wellness program success.

More organizations are realizing the expectation of an immediate return on investment (ROI) for their wellness programs though medical cost reduction is unlikely, the report states. The survey showed more organizations are focusing on the value of investment (VOI) of a program, which is based on factors that include employee morale, worksite productivity, employee absence and safety.

The survey of 703 respondents showed 64 percent with VOI-focused wellness programs compared to 28 percent with ROI-focused programs.

For full details click here: Employers Want More Value in Health – Wellness Programs

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Successful wellness program can trim disability, absence costs | Business Insurance

Leveraging a workplace wellness program to reduce short-term disability claims and employee absences can be achieved, and benefits from top management’s buy-in to the strategy. At Richmond, Virginia-based CarMax L.L.C., Benefits Director Janet Bruington said the auto retailer identified a link between a

Source: Successful wellness program can trim disability, absence costs | Business Insurance

Wellness Management: Interns In The Workplace – Energy, Enthusiasm And Real Work Experiences

Most wellness professionals know internship programs exist, and may have even been an intern at some point. Yet surprisingly few workplaces use interns in their wellness programs.

From our archive – as relevant today, maybe more so than when we first produced this report. Wellness Program Management Advisor spoke with William B. Baun, E.P.D., F.A.W.H.P., at the time manager of wellness programs at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. He has used interns for more than 20 years.

Baun’s programs target M.D. Anderson’s 16,000 employees. “I enjoy having interns around. They bring a renewed sense of energy and excitement about their chosen fields to the work environment. They ask questions that we have stopped asking ourselves. They cause us to look at processes that have gotten stagnant over time and help keep us abreast of the newest models and theories being taught in school.”

Since wellness is a broad field, a variety of schools are potential sources for internships.

Public Health
Exercise Science
Health Education
Corporate Wellness or Health
Community Health Education
Dietetics
Social Worker
Chaplaincy
M.D./Ph.D. (working on MPH projects)

Internships may be as short as a week or two, but typically run 30 to 60 days. For that reason Baun recommends a project-focused strategy. “With such a short amount of time, we give our interns a piece of a project.

“Whether it is the planning stage, marketing, implementation, or evaluation, we define our expectations, get them comfortable with their tasks, then walk away and let them run with it,” he said.

Baun recommends this approach for another reason.   Continue reading