Category Archives: Wellness Program Management

Proposed New Rule Would Amend ADA, ACA Workplace Wellness Programs

Workplace Wellness programs that may be part of a group health plan or  are offered outside of a group health plan will be affected under proposed regulations released by the The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission EEOC. The agency is accepting comments that must be received by the Commission on or before June 19, 2015.

This proposed rule provides guidance on the extent to which the ADA permits employers to offer incentives to employees to promote participation in wellness programs that are employee health programs, said the EEOC.

The agency said references in the proposed rule regarding the requirement to provide a notice and the use of incentives, and changes to the corresponding section of the interpretive guidance, apply only to wellness programs that are part of or provided by a group health plan or by a health insurance issuer offering group health insurance in connection with a group health plan.

The term “group health plan” includes both insured and self-insured group health plans and is used interchangeably with the term “health plan” throughout the preamble.

“All of the other proposed changes to the regulations apply to all “health programs,” which include wellness programs whether or not they are offered as part of or outside of a group health plan or group health insurance coverage. The term “incentives” includes both financial and in-kind incentives, such as time-off awards, prizes, or other items of value,” the agency said.

Several law firms analyzed the proposed changes.

Following are links to several of the reviews:

HHS releases HIPAA guidance on workplace wellness programs | Data Privacy and Security Insider.

http://www.employmentmattersblog.com/2015/04/the-eeoc-provides-welcome-guidance-on-employment-based-wellness-plans/?utm_source=Mondaq&utm_medium=syndication&utm_campaign=View-Original

http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/five-ways-the-eeoc-proposed-wellness-reg-23794/

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Wellness Committees Prove Their Value

Workplace wellness committees are important elements of successful workplace health promotion programs, according to the results of a workplace wellness management survey conducted by Wellness Program Management Advisor and http://www.WellnessJunction.com.

Almost 75 percent of the survey participants said they have a wellness committee for their organizational programs, and 80 percent said the committees are important for the success of their workplace wellness efforts, the survey revealed.

Feedback

“The feedback the committee members provide is invaluable,” said a wellness program manager. “They represent the employee population and are very plugged in to what they need and want from a workplace wellness department.”

The committee also helps compose wellness information surveys that are circulated among all employee groups; in addition, they assist wellness department members with survey analysis, the manager said.

“We believe it’s important to know what people outside the wellness department are thinking and feeling,” the respondent noted. “We think we know, but the wellness committee often brings other issues to our attention. It’s a good idea to have many minds that are generating ideas. That’s a valuable service.”

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Wellness Committees: Best Practices and Proven Strategies for Success

90-Minute Workplace Wellness Management Training Program on CD-Rom
Get step-by-step practical ‘how-to’ details; the qualities to look
for in prospective members; insider ideas on how to go about choosing
your wellness committee wisely,  crafting your mission statement, the ground
rules and organizing the early-stage meetings of your committee.

https://www.healthresourcesonline.com/workplace-wellness-/wellness-committees-best-practices-and-proven-strategies-for-success.html
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And the end result is program and process improvement, respondents noted.

“It’s a way for us to hear what others want and need in a wellness program,” said a project leader. “New ideas and suggestions are the things that help us maintain focus.” Continue reading

Active Listening Essential for Wellness Professionals – at Work and Home

After a rough day at work — placing others people’s problems into perspective — you may be faced with communication conflicts at home as well. For that reason, effective communication is a must!

According to Stephen M. Horowitz, Ph.D., who at the time achieved FAWHP status, active listening is a very important component of communication. Active listening, said Horowitz, “defuses anger by acknowledging the emotion and it allows you to decide whether or not you want to ‘buy into’ someone else’s momentary craziness.” Continue reading

Applying Quality Management (QM) Principles To Wellness Committees

Their is no disputing that the heart of a successful wellness program lies in a dynamic committee.  And, many important QM principles can be applied to the structure and function of your wellness committee.

Almost 75 percent of wellness professionals surveyed said they have a wellness committee for their organizational programs, and 80 percent said the committees are important for the success of their workplace wellness efforts, the survey revealed.  The survey was conducted by the Wellness Management Information Center.

Feedback

“The feedback the committee members provide is invaluable,” said a wellness program manager.  “They represent  Continue reading

Workplace Wellness Certificate Tells the World You Know Your Stuff

Editor’s Note: This article is one of the most read posts on Wellness Manager.

A certification program raises the professional stature of the profession. A ‘certified’ manager in any profession is generally worth more money in the marketplace.

It is a credential that could mean the difference in competing for or getting a job.

It tells the hiring manager that you worked harder than the other person to earn the certificate. Generally, only a percentage of the profession will rise to hold the certificate.

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Secrets to Wellness and Health Promotion ROI: How Successful Managers Attract and Motivate Increased Participation in Their Programs PDF Format
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The National Wellness Institute and WebMD launched a five level Certification Program for Worksite Wellness practitioners.

Larry Chapman, a well known and highly regarded expert consultant on wellness and health promotion, has been serving as the trainer for the certification classes held in conjunction with the annual National Wellness Institute program.

Each level requires two full days of training and successful completion of a Challenge Exam. Each level is focused on twelve different key skills critical to the design and implementation of a successful employee wellness program, according to the program description.

Level I Certified Wellness Program Coordinator (CWPC) is designed for organizations with fewer than a thousand employees. Level II Certified Wellness Program Manager (CWPM) is for organizations with 1,000 to 10,000 employees.

Level III Certified Wellness Program Director (CWPD) is for organizations with more than 10,000 employees. Level IV Certified Worksite Wellness Program Consultant (CWWPC) can then work with any size organization.

The Level V Certified Worksite Wellness Professional (CWWP) is for any size organization plus ten (10) years of progressively more challenging program management and authorship of a recent related peer review article on worksite wellness.

For information on the Worksite Wellness professional certification program visit the National Wellness Institute: http://www.nationalwellness.org/?page=CWP

New Study: Workplace Wellness Programs Seen Cutting Chronic Costs

Workplace wellness programs can lower health care costs in workers with chronic diseases, but components of the programs that encourage workers to adopt healthier lifestyles may not reduce health costs or lead to lower net savings, according to a new research study.

Following a large employee wellness program sponsored PepsiCo, the study conducted by the Rand Corporation found that “efforts to help employees manage chronic illnesses saved $3.78 in health care costs for every $1 invested in the effort.”

However, the program’s lifestyle management components that encourage healthy living did not deliver returns that were higher than the costs, the researchers found.

“The PepsiCo program provides a substantial return for the investment made in helping employees manage chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease,” said Dr. Soeren Mattke, the study’s senior author and a senior natural scientist at RAND, a nonprofit research organization.

“But the lifestyle management component of the program — while delivering benefits — did not provide more savings than it cost to offer,” he continued.

With any prevention effort, it is often “easier to achieve cost savings in Continue reading

2014! Resolutions Don’t Come Easy

Happy New Year!

As we head into the New Year people are trying to hang on to their recently made resolutions. However, it is not enough to simply make a resolution; you must be motivated to sticking to it, according to one wellness professional.

Here are four keys to success in keeping resolutions that wellness program managers can share with program participants:

The first key to success is learning how to stay motivated.

“Motivation comes in spurts, so you have to work at keeping it in the forefront of your mind.”

Wellness program managers can help with employee motivation in a number of ways. Continue reading

“A Rose By Any Other Name……What’s In a Name….Or, In This Case Your Job Title?

The position titles of individuals managing or administering an organization’s wellness or health promotion program is high up on the searches by visitors to Wellness Manager.

The simple search query is “wellness titles.”

Although their duties are similar in scope, yes, workplace wellness professionals’ titles vary widely by organization, based on research by the Wellness Management Information Center.

Wellness professionals’ titles, it seems, are all over the “ballpark.”

By title, “coordinator” was the most frequent with 26.5 percent of participants, followed by “manager” with 22 percent, and “director” with 18.9 percent, found our research survey.

However, among all survey respondents, 42.4 percent had the word “wellness” as part of their title, while “health promotion” titles accounted for 12.1 percent of those who responded.

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Secrets to Wellness and Health Promotion ROI: How Successful Managers Attract and Motivate Increased Participation in PDF Format

Get success stories, expert advice, proven methods, practical goals, and “how-to” tips in this report created by our editorial team as an ‘insider’ briefing for workplace wellness and health promotion professionals.

Secrets To Wellness and Health Promotion ROI: How Successful Managers Attract and Motivate Increased Participation  

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Following is a representative sample of titles that we identified based on our survey:

wellness coordinator, wellness director, wellness/fitness manager, corporate wellness coordinator, director community health and wellness, director of health promotion, director,  and, worksite preventive health.

Also, employee health/wellness coordinator, health and wellness coordinator, health improvement manager, health promotion manager, health education and wellness manager and wellness program manager.

Share your thoughts with us:

Workplace Wellness Management Resources New Web Address

Our wellness management resources store page has a new web address following our migration to our new, improved web site at healthresourcesonline.com.

The store is protected for security with “Secure Socket Layer” or SSL to keep your transactions secure.

Because there are so many links to our management resources up on the Web we think it is a good idea to give you the new location link: https://www.healthresourcesonline.com/workplace-wellness-management.html

Program Success Motivates Employees To Participate In Health Promotion Programs

Getting employees to participate in worksite wellness programs is has been an ongoing chief concern of many wellness managers over the years, according to our Workplace Wellness Management Leadership survey.

Participation is the issue, said one corporate human resources director, because “most people are too busy or not motivated enough.”

Employee participation in an organization’s wellness program drives everything for wellness professionals, return on investment (ROI), healthier workforce, continued program funding and budget issues, and how a wellness manager is measured, so its a bottom line pocket-book issue.

Main concern: “Time crunch, employees can’t seem to find the time to get into the onsite fitness center,” said a company RN/fitness coordinator. “People in general just seem to be getting busier and busier!”

“It is just our lifestyles today as well as the mentality of employers — do more with less people,” the coordinator added.       Continue reading